Second Life For 17th Century Furnace

The oven which was found by archaeologists of the Department of Monuments and Archaeology of the City of Amsterdam, a month ago at Spuistraat, will be rebuilt. Within 18 months one can be visiting the oven on the externally accessible courtyard of the new residential complex ‘De Keizer’ on Wijdesteeg in Amsterdam.

AMS-ontmanteling-oven

The oven that was found during the archaeological survey was part of the seventeenth century soap manufacture ‘De Clock’ (The Bell). Originally, the oven was used by brewery Delfftsche Wapen which was located in the same building from approximately 1510 to 1608. The oven consisted of a round brick construction with max. 3.4 m outside diameter, 1.3 m inner diameter and an inner wall of chamotte stone. The floor was made up of a lattice of chamotte bricks, supported by a structure of wrought iron. The iron door was still present and on the grate they found layers of peat blocks. The oven and the deeper boiler room could be reached through a brick staircase, which was filled up with construction debris and household waste from the last quarter of the 17th century. This archaeological dating fits in well with the historical fact that the ‘De Clock’ soap manufacture was closed in 1680.

AMS-3D-model
For those who can’t wait, the oven is recorded in a 3D model

Click here for the 3D model.

The director of the construction company who develops residential complex ‘De Keizer’ was particularly struck by the discovery and therefore decided to rebuild the furnace. The oven is carefully dismantled two weeks ago by a team of archaeologists and construction workers. The iron parts are being preserved in the coming period in the archaeological workshop. Later, the oven will again be built, brick by brick, in the courtyard of the complex. The courtyard will also externally accessible so interested parties can take a look.